Sketches – Orkan Class Carrier

The Orkan-Class Carrier is the deWulf take on the Sintillan-designed Roman Kurinnyj-Class Carrier. Taking advantage of multiple technological developments and hard learned lessons from combat, the Orkan is also the first fighter carrier in the deWulf Corporate Navy.

The best way to examine the Orkan is in the light of its predecessor, the Roman Kurinnyj-Class. The first, and biggest difference is in sheer size. The Orkan follows the deWulf practice of building “big” hulls, trading off a higher top speed for more mass at a given engine efficiency. As well, the Orkan is only 3/5s the speed of its sister carrier. Even so, it continues to use commercial engines, ensuring that it has the strategic speed needed to keep up with the rest of the fleet. Finally, it also has the same point defense suite, though a newer, more efficient model.

Combat effectiveness for the Orkan is as yet unknown, as its first combat appearance is in the 3rd battle of Elysium. Tests in simulation and fleet exercises have suggested that the Orkan should function as well as expected. So long as hostile craft are kept well away, it should be an effective force multiplier, but its thin passive defenses and token point defense suite makes it distinctly vulnerable.

The Orkan is another design concept that looks at the continual problem that exists for deWulf ships: what is the transitory state between a DD and a CA? The Orkan is another evolution to try and work out just what this intermediary design should look like, and how it should be put together. One other thing worth noting is that the Orkan almost has the same volume as a heavy cruiser (a normal CA is 60 hull spaces; the Orkan is 51) so it’s possibly even more of a transitory state then a “normal” light cruiser. The two big “changes” that exist on her are the use of her front jaw to hold a launch bay, and the more “Sintillan” side bays instead of the more conventional deWulf angular bays.

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